Image by F Cary Snyder

ESALEN® MASSAGE

Developed in the 1960s, at Esalen Institute in Big Sur, California, Esalen​® Massage is a truly unique and holistic style of bodywork that, through the balm of touch, applies the principles of intention, awareness and presence in order to help re-establish a sense of whole-being wellness in the recipient.  Esalen® Massage has been described as “the meeting and merging of form, energy, structure, and soul.”  Or more familiarly:  the reconnection, reintegration, of Mind, Body and Spirit. 


Defined by its nurturing, elegant and graceful, long and integrative strokes, alternating rhythmic pressure, and detailed and nuanced attention to the body, an Esalen® Massage is a truly meditative experience that inspires a state of deep relaxation and restorative healing.  Enhancing somatic awareness and inner balance, an Esalen® Massage will achieve therapeutic effects without painful (or damaging) deep-tissue techniques – while never sacrificing attention to troubled areas through its uniquely slow and focused muscle work, use of gentle rocking, joint mobilizations, passive stretches, and assimilative pauses to help release emotional and physical tension and stress-induced holding patterns.


Following an Esalen® Massage, clients feel integrated and harmonized - and awakened to their own inner healing resources, which continue long after the session itself.  Very often a practitioner will hear, “This was the most amazing massage I’ve ever had!”  Trained and Certified as an Esalen Professional through the Esalen® Massage and Bodywork Association, Nina Dmitrieff is honored to be able to offer this extraordinary form of bodywork - as either a 90 or 120 minute session - at The Grove Studio for Natural Healing.

Please know that in compliance with the strict professional policies in both the States of Georgia and Florida, we adhere to - without exception - medical draping protocols. Private areas (including breasts) will never be exposed, nor will any area of the body that is not being treated be left uncovered by sheeting.

 
Image by Riaan Myburgh

“We know what we are.  We know not what we may be.”

William Shakespeare